Letters to the Editor for Wednesday, May 8

first_imgPoliticians are not upholding their oathWell, Gov. Andrew Cuomo lies and is trying to shut down the NRA. He says all the NRA wants to do is sell guns. First of all, the NRA is not a store; it doesn’t sell guns. What it does is protect our right to bear arms. Gov. Cuomo, when he was elected, took an oath to serve and protect the Constitution of the United States of America and this he does not do. Also, what he is doing is  taking away the right to free speech. Another one doing the same thing is Mitch O’Farrell of California. I wonder, do these politicians laugh at us when they take the oath and say to themselves, “Ya right, I’ll do whatever the hell I want.” The only way I can get this message to people is if you share my message.Anthony G. MontePrincetown Jansson will be an advocate for kids The quality of any school is more than the advance-placement opportunities that it offers its students or its average state testing scores. An environment of care and compassion is equally important.Niskayuna had a spectacular public failure in that domain when our students hurled racial insults at the guest team during a varsity soccer game in the fall of 2018. Past N-CAP surveys have shown unacceptably high rates of substance use and anxiety among Niskayuna students.Happily, the school district is making an effort to improve the environment through various measures, and that’s why it’s critical that we elect school board members who have shown a commitment to helping Niskayuna school students become compassionate and caring citizens of this world.School board candidate Greta Jansson has exemplified that commitment in her years as an active Niskayuna parent. Whether it’s as a volunteer for Friends of Music and youth athletic events or as an advocate for diversity in the school district, she has been a committed advocate for Niskayuna families. The Niskayuna school district will be a better place with Greta Jansson on its board.Aliya SaeedNiskayuna Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionGroup seeks rational approach to safetyIn response to the April 28 Gazette article, Saratoga Parents for Safer Schools (SPFSS) remains a grassroots organization, founded with the intention of restoring previously effective safety to our schools. The mission of SPFSS is transparent, despite attempts to muddy the waters with false information. SPFSS did not hire Go Right Strategies in the capacity of “political consultant.” They were highly recommended by a friend and offered to assist with content creation at cost.  They don’t profit from this endeavor. It goes directly towards marketing and advertising online. We’ve paid $3,200 for content development, $5,000 for social media and $800 for voter identification data. The $5,000 for social media is a pass through they pay to Facebook and Google.Similarly, we have costs associated with a printing firm. The printer will be paid  $15,000 for its services, with money passed through to the USPS.Not having experience in graphic design or implementation, the expertise of outside companies was sought. Any attempt by opposing candidates or the media to sully this effort is done in hopes of distracting the community from the issue of safety. SPFSS has endorsed Dean, Ed and Shaun because they believe in a common sense approach to safety, security and prevention. They understand that the retired law enforcement officers’ help is essential in mitigating a 7-minute response time in the event of an emergency. They have the experience, skill set and commitment to community that the teachers, students and staff deserve, and SPFSS is hopeful that the focus going forward will remain on the candidates and their myriad qualifications.Kara RosettieWilton Vote for candidates who are fair and careAccording to The Gazette’s April 27 article, “Saratoga Springs school board candidates tap national GOP political consultant,” a political group has raised over $33,000 for the upcoming Saratoga Springs Board of Education election. Of that, $12,000 came from a single donor and  $9,000 of the group’s war chest is going to pay for a professional political marketing firm that has worked for clients like Ted Cruz. What the heck?Do we want to be the kind of community that has an arms race of political spending in our local elections? Do we really want Saratoga Springs to descend into the kind of divisive, politically polarized stand-off we see in so many other places?I say no. Let’s be a community where we can have reasonable, civil debates without all the partisan venom. Let’s be a community where we spend our money on strengthening learning, the arts, athletics and mental health resources. Let’s have a school district where we care more about students than about pushing a political agenda.Throughout this campaign, John Brueggemann, Natalya Lakhtakia, and Heather Reynolds have shown that they will be board members who act like neighbors. I will be voting for them on May 21 because they are independently minded, willing to listen and fair. A vote for them is a vote for a better community.Andrew LindnerSaratoga Springs Need president who upholds our valuesWe Americans must address the problem of favoring a candidate because of his/her stance on a single issue, even if that issue is very important. The environment is one such issue, as are reproductive rights, the economy and gun safety, to name a few.Yet, the best candidate is one with the vision and capacity to deal with the whole spectrum of challenges that beset a nation as vast and diverse as ours. He or she won’t be an authority on every issue, but will have the humility and foresight to choose and then listen to wise and competent advisers. And while there is no “perfect” candidate, the ideal is to have one whose personal philosophy and political agenda reflect the highest of human qualities: a true desire to serve, compassion for the most vulnerable, a thirst for justice for all and an enduring trust in the basic goodness of humanity.Democracy honors the dignity and value of every human being, and the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights are the standard-bearers of these concepts. The best president understands and holds precious these documents that define and support the moral fiber of our country. As we continue to weigh our options for the 2020 election, we must take very seriously our responsibility to choose that person who has intellectual and moral breadth and who can give us hope for the future.Patricia S. JohnsonBallston Spa Protect wetlands from developmentI appreciate The Gazette’s continued emphasis on environmental protection and safety (Time to Get Busy on the Environment, April 28 editorial). But in terms of greatest bang for the buck, you missed an important bill that saves land, water and money. Avoiding unnecessary damage to lands, such as wetlands, that ought not to be developed in the first place saves a lot of money from being spent on remediating pollution and other damage after development occurs.Your editorial ought to have championed, therefore, Assembly bill 3658 (Mr. Englebright, et. al.), which redefines freshwater wetlands in state law from 12.4 acres down to 1 acre, affording much more state protection to smaller wetlands, many thousands of which have been dredged, filled and paved over.Protecting smaller wetlands upstream means more protection of sensitive species like salamanders, more water storage and fewer stormwater events, flooding and remediation of our waterfronts, lakes, and rivers.In the longer run, that means less public expenditures on costly infrastructure after damage has occurred, especially in a time of much more intense rainfall.This expanded wetland protection makes a great deal of sense and the bill ought to have The Gazette’s full support.David GibsonBallston Lake Trump, not Russia, responsible for winLet me see if I understand that Russian influence in 2016. The facts are that Mrs. Clinton gathered 65,844,954 votes and Donald Trump gathered 62,979,879 votes. If the Russians favored Trump and disliked Mrs. Clinton, they failed miserably by 2,865,075 votes. Democrats need to get off the Kool-Aid and look at the facts of the popular vote and the Electoral College vote. Trump’s brilliant strategy to garner electoral votes gave him the win. Russian influence had nothing to do with it. How could it? But Democrats hate our president and will not let it go. I say let’s vote in 2020. No contest for Trump to be re-elected, in my view.James M. Schaefer, Ph.D.SchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccinelast_img read more

Barclays gathers fire for £300m retail park fund

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Raven flies free

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Niche market

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Far East giant plans £300m UK assault

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Who cares wins

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Man of auctions

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CBRE forges Middle Eastern alliances

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Airlines face growth warning as virus curtails Singapore Airshow

first_imgThe Pentagon reduced the size of its delegation to the air show, which had been set to include its chief weapons buyer, US Undersecretary of Defense Ellen Lord, Reuters reported on Friday.Singapore on Friday raised its alert level for the coronavirus outbreak to orange, the same level reached during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory System (SARS) pandemic, sparking panic buying at supermarkets across the island.There are 43 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Singapore. The orange alert level advises organizers to cancel or defer non-essential large-scale events and recommends precautions such as temperature screening and more frequent cleaning of common areas for those that do proceed.Health experts, however, said they were concerned that temperature screening might not be effective, given reports the coronavirus could be spread by people without symptoms.”Temperature screening is okay to pick up people already sick – and those people should not be coming to the show anyway – but doesn’t pick up people incubating the virus,” said John McBride, an infectious disease physician and professor at Australia’s James Cook University.SIA Engineering Company Ltd and GE Aviation on Monday said they had postponed plans to hold a groundbreaking ceremony for a new engine overhaul facility in Singapore on Tuesday until further notice because of the raised alert level.Saudi Arabia’s General Authority for Military Industries withdrew from the show late Sunday, citing concerns associated with the coronavirus.The air show’s organizers said on Sunday they were expecting more than 930 companies from 45 countries and 45,000 trade attendees – down from the 54,000 at the last show in 2018. They also plan to limit public attendance.The lobbies of major hotels, usually bustling with attendees, were noticeably quiet.A spokeswoman for the organizers on Monday declined to provide an update on numbers and why the air show was going ahead when many smaller associated events and briefings were being cancelled over coronavirus concerns.Canceling the show would lead to refunds running into the tens of millions of dollars, a source at one of the exhibitors told Reuters on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter.Organiser Experia Events, partly owned by ST Engineering and government agencies, charges at least S$1,550 per square meter for space in the show’s exhibition hall, according to its website.That would equate to more than S$3 million (US$2.16 million) for ST Engineering’s booth, the show’s largest at more than 2,000 square meters. ST Engineering is majority owned by Singapore state investor Temasek Holdings.Experia Events managing director Leck Chet Lam on Sunday said he could not comment on the financial terms of a cancellation.”That is between us and the exhibitor,” he told reporters.Topics : Few deals are expected at the biennial event, where the epidemic has triggered new safety measures and cast a shadow over airline profits and demand for airplanes.Before the coronavirus hit, the International Air Transport Association had expected passenger numbers to rise by 4 percent in 2020 and cargo traffic to be 2 percent higher.”All bets are off in terms of traffic forecasts for this year,” Andrew Herdman, the director general of the Association for Asia Pacific Airlines, said in an interview.”If you look at the schedule cuts and the actual operations they have been cut by 50 percent, 60 percent, 70 percent within China. It is pretty drastic,” he said. Asian airlines face “drastic” cuts in their planned growth because of the coronavirus crisis, an industry group warned, adding gloom to an already depleted Singapore Airshow as more companies scaled back plans on Monday.The Singapore Airshow from Feb. 11 to 16 is proceeding, but the exhibition center is pockmarked with empty spaces that would have held displays from Chinese companies and others skipping the show because of the epidemic, which has killed more than 900 people.More than 70 exhibitors, including major United States defense firms Lockheed Martin Corp and Raytheon Co have pulled out over concerns related to the new coronavirus.last_img read more

Thousands wait for hospital beds in South Korea as coronavirus cases surge

first_img“In order to overcome COVID-19 as quickly as possible and minimise the impact on the economy, it is necessary to proactively inject all available resources.”COVID-19 is the illness caused by the new coronavirus which emerged from central China late last year and has spread around the world.Hospitals in South Korea’s hardest hit areas were scrambling to accommodate the surge in new patients.In Daegu, 2,300 people were waiting to be admitted to hospitals and temporary medical facilities, Vice Health Minister Kim Gang-lip said.A 100-bed military hospital that had been handling many of the most serious cases was due to have 200 additional beds available by Thursday, he added.South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Tuesday declared “war” on the virus, apologised for shortages of face masks and promised support for virus-hit small businesses in Asia’s fourth-biggest economy. Topics : South Korea reported 516 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday as thousands of sick people waited for hospital beds in Daegu, the city at the center of the worst outbreak outside mainland China.The new cases bring South Korea’s total to 5,328, with at least 32 deaths, mostly in and around Daegu where the flu-like virus has spread rapidly through members of a fringe Christian group.“We need special measures in times of emergency,” South Korean Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun said during a special cabinet meeting.last_img read more

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